Word of the Day Challenge – Patterns

….the word for Word of the Day Challenge is patterns

Patterns are everywhere. Some are man-made and others occur naturally in nature.

Iris van Herpen: Transforming Fashion

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Totem Pole at the ROM
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Budda Head
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Grid platform on the climbers
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 Fireworks – Random Pattern
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Pattern in Nature
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Symmetrical Pattern
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Asymetrical Pattern
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Artistic Pattern by Kenojuak Ashevak
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Persian Rug
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Horizontal and Vertical Line Patterns
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Diagonal Patterns
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Brick Work
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WPC – Scale

scale
[skāl]

NOUN
scales (plural noun)
  1. the relative size or extent of something:
    “no one foresaw the scale of the disaster” · “everything in the house is on a grand scale”
    synonyms: extent · size · scope · magnitude · dimensions · range · breadth · compass · degree · reach · spread · sweep
    • a ratio of size in a map, model, drawing, or plan:
      “a one-fifth scale model of a seven-story building” · “an Ordnance Survey map on a scale of 1:2500”
      synonyms: ratio · proportion · relative size
    • mathematics
      a system of numerical notation in which the value of a digit depends upon its position in the number, successive positions representing successive powers of a fixed base:
      “the conversion of the number to the binary scale”
    • photography
      the range of exposures over which a photographic material will give an acceptable variation in density.

      This week’s theme for WordPress’ Photo Challenge is scale.fullsizeoutput_7198P1040183IMG_3468fullsizeoutput_7731fullsizeoutput_7751fullsizeoutput_7758IMG_3791

    • This last shot was taken by my son on his way back from Chicago to London. The island at the north end of the shot is Christian Island where our cottage is situated.

Florence, Italy -An Art Lovers Paradise

…..Florence is well known for famous sculptures, paintings and architecture 

Everyone told me I’d love the art in Florence. There certainly was a lot of it. The city is noted for its culture, Renaissance art, architecture and monuments. The city also contains numerous museums and art galleries, such as the Uffizi Gallery and the Palazzo Pitti.

Florence was home to one of European history’s most important noble families, the Medici. In 1469, Lorenzo de Medici, grandson to Cosimo, took over control of the city from behind the scenes. He was a great patron of the arts, commissioning works by Michelangelo, Leonardo da Vinci and Botticelli. To his peers he was known as Lorenzo il Magnifico which ironically was also the name of the street our apartment was on.

If you are going to Florence in the near future I would recommend that you prebook your tickets to the Uffizi Gallery. We booked on line the night before and went right to the front of the line when we arrived at our designated time. In fact we were ushered to an even faster line because we had the baby with us. Even though the baby was free of charge they wanted to see her passport before they gave us our tickets. We didn’t have the passport so we pleaded ignorance. Who knew? Did they think we were going to smuggle in an adult on an infant’s ticket? Other than that, getting into the popular Uffizi was quick and relatively easy and well worth the few extra euros to book ahead of time.

We never did get to see the real Michelangelo’s David. The two in the gallery above were replicas. I thought I would be disappointed if I didn’t get to the real one but there was so much to see and do and it was so hot in Florence that it wasn’t worth the ultimate exhaustion we would have suffered trying to get to the Galleria dell’Accademia di Firenze, which is now the home of Michelangelo’s sculpture of David. Maybe I’ll go there the next time I’m in Florence.

Ciao!

Venice Architecture Biennale 2016

….featuring different aspects of architecture from around the world

One of the must see venues in Venice for my family on our recent trip was to take in some of the Venice Biennale exhibits, mainly the the Victoria and Albert contribution curated by our son.

For those who have never heard of biennales let me explain. A biennale takes place every two years. They are large international art exhibitions dealing with contemporary issues around art, music and architecture and take place all over the world. The Venice Biennale was founded in 1895 and highlighted city marketing, urban regeneration and cultural tourism. This year’s theme is titled REPORTING FROM THE FRONT, and is curated by Alejandro Aravena. The show runs from May to September and the exhibits can be found at  the Giardini and the Arsenale.

The exhibit our son curated in agreement with la Biennale di Venizia and  the Victoria and Albert Museum out of London, England is titled A World of Fragile Parts and focuses on how the production of copies throughout history and today has aided in the preservation of cultural artefacts.

This exhibit highlights the new technologies that make it possible to fabricate copies of historical artefacts that are ravaged by war, tourism and environmental factors. For more information about the exhibit go here.

Unfortunately while we were there our son was not so to prove that we actually went and saw the exhibit we posed in front of the sign for A World of Fragile Parts. Even the baby got involved by pointing out her uncle’s name on the list of credits. A week later Brendan did go back to Venice to give a talk and teach a class on the exhibit.

My only regret is that we didn’t get to see more of the Biennale. Two days in Venice is not enough time.