Monday Windows and Thursday Doors – July 29, 2021

….thanks to Dan from No Facilities for hosting Thursday Doors and to Ludwig for hosting Monday Window https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/07/26/monday-window-july-26-2021/

Last week Kevin and I took a trip to Guelph to give our granddaughters a tour of the university where we met and went to school. The girls will be going there in the fall. We had a great day and hope to make many more trips in the next few years.

I focused on the older buildings because they have so much more charm and character. The residences that were once all male or all female are now co-ed. The girls are actually in their second year so they didn’t qualify to live on campus because the residences are for first year students only. Last year all their classes were on-line so they studied from home.

IMG-3325
IMG-3327
IMG-3326
IMG-3328
IMG-3329
IMG-3330
IMG-3336
IMG-3335

Dan is off this week and will be back August 5th.

Monday Window – Long Branch Cottages

….thanks to Ludwig for hosting Monday Window https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/05/17/monday-window-may-17-2021/

South Etobicoke in Toronto where I live is divided into three areas along the waterfront. The area on the east side is Mimico, New Toronto is in the middle and Long Branch is on the west side. Last week I took a drive over to Long Branch to check out the waterfront.

Long Branch was originally owned by Col. Samuel Smith in the early 1800s. He had a large family and he tried his hand at farming after he left military service. He apparently wasn’t a very good farmer and five of his seven children never married and continued to live in their parents’ home after they died.

​In 1861, James and Margaret Eastwood purchased the old house and 500 acres of lakefront property from the Smith Estate. They cleared the timber and farmed the land. In 1883, they sold 64 acres on the eastern edge of their property to a consortium which developed it into an exclusive summer resort area. The land was subdivided into 250 villa lots where the well-off could build summer cottages.(copied from the Etobicoke Historical Society). http://www.etobicokehistorical.com/long-branch.html

Many of these magnificent ‘cottages’ still stand today. It always amuses me to think that people who lived in Toronto travelled 10 to 20 kilometres in the summer to travel to their summer homes.

1875099-F-60-BC-4277-BD94-A460837-DC521
3-F2-A7-A62-D8-F1-4-A7-A-A3-BC-A102-EAA834-AF
258-FBD51-B4-DB-4-ED1-AC67-6-BAF44-C1-F8-F9
0659-CC85-18-DC-470-A-AA76-39259360-FD94
52-C2-FA45-8-F9-E-43-C3-B9-EF-DC09910-D93-FF
9463-F397-B7-C1-4303-ADFD-46-B529107-EFE
769-A7-E56-F449-466-D-A1-C3-3-EB2947-ABA96

Thursday Doors – A Whole Community of Painted Gingerbread Houses

thanks to Dan for hosting Thursday Doors https://nofacilities.com/2021/04/29/glastonbury-doors/

Grimsby Beach Village is well known for it’s Painted Ladies or Gingerbread Houses. The community was originally a Methodist Bible Camp in the 1800s and when the tents came down they were replaced with modest cottages. In 1909 the camp went bankrupt. It was purchased by a developer who converted the area into an amusement park.

In the 1920s 30 of the cottages burned down and tourists went elsewhere. It was taken over by a Cottagers’ Association but over the years the remaining cottages suffered from disrepair. Fast forward to 1986 when a handyman Ed Giernat, purchased one of the 150-year old homes and decided to add gingerbread and other decorative trim moulding and paint his house orange, green, blue and white. Now dozens of “painted ladies” houses adorn the streets of Grimsby Beach because of Ed’s vision and his willingness to help others fix-up their homes.  ( data re history came from Everyday Tourist https://everydaytourist.ca/wandering-canada/southern-ontario-road-trip-grimsby-beachs-painted-ladies)

E0-C1-AB70-26-EB-4856-BB3-D-286-CD7-B322-B6
2-E4323-C4-A548-49-FD-9247-9-A42-BACC8-AC0
D33-D9435-130-D-423-B-B413-0692-C15-ADE86
BDB143-F5-D91-D-40-FF-8-C61-965540865-EB0
4-C2-C968-F-0-A31-44-D3-8-A8-B-3-EC7-F1227-EBC
9-D42-C9-AC-0182-4332-BFE8-108-B7-A10427-E
14-CC641-F-5990-4-F45-B897-54-C653053-DFD
985-F48-B5-DAF0-4-A6-F-A7-EF-ED5916-FE8899
7-F48-C8-D9-B81-F-49-B0-8944-F379-D900-F765
A6-BF8452-2741-4911-A1-A1-2-CF153-A9-C6-C8

Monday Window – April 26, 2021

thanks to Ludwig for hosting Monday Window https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/04/26/monday-window-april-26-2021/

From earlier posts you’ve probably noticed that my husband and I made a trip to Grimsby Beach last week and came across a village of very brightly painted homes. In this post I’ve concentrated on the windows. On Thursday I’ll post in Thursday Doors to feature the doors.

3-A870-F1-A-603-C-4106-9-B10-7788-BB574570
29-EBA975-01-D2-4-B3-F-BE9-F-CFF50445-F494
87-E3394-D-5-C6-F-4304-9-B6-C-BCE252914-B55
6201-B76-E-FC4-B-46-CA-A344-E0-E693-B526-B7
36-BDAB7-B-5-D46-4844-90-AC-A7-D49576-F7-D1
0010-EC78-329-B-410-F-845-D-EF60-B8-E9765-C
B4-E38508-783-A-4-DFD-ACEF-09521-C93962-B
F7919-EDA-F96-C-4-B6-A-8-BA0-B839035-E29-A6
1-FB51-FBF-A3-E5-4-FCB-8647-C9-C11-EF9-A0-FD
A54-F2502-CE6-D-41-ED-BCAF-1-E0260-F1-AD06

Thursday Trios – Different Perspectives

….welcome to Thursday Trios #15

My submissions this week involve looking into the distance (yes there are three windmills), a black and white photo taken from behind and a coloured close-up of three dolls.

IMG-1295
IMG-1921
P1000921

If you’d like to join Thursday Trios, simply find photos with people or objects grouped in threes and copy the link and paste it into your blog. I will comment on your contribution when I see the ping back. Enjoy!

Monday Window – Humber College -South Campus

….this is all about the old vs the new

Most of the buildings on the south campus of Humber College are from the late 18th century when the grounds were the Psychiatric Hospital. Originally built as a branch of the Toronto Asylum for the Insane, the hospital officially opened its doors in 1890 as the Mimico Asylum — the first such institution in Canada to be built on the cottage system. After the hospital closed in 1979 the buildings stood empty and in 1988 it was declared a heritage site.

When Humber signed a 99-year lease for the land and buildings in 1991, it began a complete restoration of the cottage buildings. Today the buildings have been restored to their original beauty and serve as classrooms and studios for the students. In between some of the old building a few new modern structures have been built. It’s a nice contrast between new and old.

93753-C70-5-E90-429-A-8-CC1-868687-DBEC78 58-F993-E0-2733-4-F80-8892-C6-B7-F3988081 CF44-EA18-251-F-4144-BEF1-0-E2286-FA6-FD3 07-FC1586-5075-46-CF-8326-1-E9-C997-A6341 9-A4-AFD48-CC5-F-4-C9-A-97-D5-934-AEF54528-F C9-BDB376-469-E-44-A2-8896-5301-F2-B48684-1-201-a 904-F45-C5-4-CE3-4610-B2-E4-39-B39-C2-A5361-1-201-a

Thanks to Ludwig for hosting Monday Window https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/03/22/monday-window-march-22-2021/

Monday Window – Oak Hall

thanks to Ludwig for hosting Monday Window https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/03/15/monday-window-march-15-2021/

On our outing last week to Niagara Falls I noticed a grand building high up on the cliffs and my husband told me that it was Oak Hall. Once we explored the falls, the river and Dufferin Islands we got in the car and drove up to the top of the cliff to take a closer look.

Oak Hall is a 37-room, three-story Tudor-style stone mansion that was built in the late 1920s for mining tycoon Harry Oakes. The Oakes family lived there for six years before moving to the Bahamas. Oak Hall was purchased by the Niagara Parks Commission on May 25, 1952 and for a few years, it housed displays by the Niagara District Art Association. Oak Hall currently houses 23 offices, meeting and storage rooms. Displays of Niagara Falls art and the furnished rooms are still open to the public. 

719-CA75-F-C16-B-49-DC-877-F-C7-EE53149821-1-201-a 84-EDDEC5-5447-4-E5-D-846-A-A079837353-DA 86-DC2-F78-0179-464-C-B88-E-1-AA88-ACA0-B59 A0-C51102-DA3-A-4519-BFEE-4-F27-A16416-BC A0719-C3-D-593-C-43-D3-9053-3-D482-F5-D0668 3-C06-BEE9-FE4-B-421-B-9009-849-A62643-DC6 D672-E751-8-D5-D-448-B-9-ECD-520982-DBD8-AD 17-AE5-ED3-27-D7-4620-888-F-31-F904-CB807-C 35-F0-CC3-D-2-B79-4689-B337-5-D0-A5-D602-A4-F

The house overlooks the Niagara River and the Dufferin Islands. I can only imagine that it is a lovely place to sit in the summer while enjoying the view.

8-BB35-E70-D7-D2-4-A3-F-8-FAF-5-F4-BD2-ADB7-B6 9-FC85636-07-F1-4864-A861-E3155-FFCAEF1 2-C35312-A-2-AD2-48-D9-8-E3-A-D46-E50-C3-CE6-D 582-AD50-E-A070-40-FD-BC89-DB100089-F8-A3 91-A7-C154-86-A2-4-DFF-A2-D0-46-E61003830-E 9-D1-E236-D-10-B9-46-AE-AB16-3-ECC7-E1-C3242

Toronto Power Generating Station – Thursday Doors

….thanks to Dan Antion from No Facilities for hosting Thursday Doors https://nofacilities.com/2021/03/11/waterbury-union-station-thursday-doors/

The Toronto Power Generating Station is a former generating station located along the Niagara River on the Canadian side. The building was completed in 1906  and was built by the Electrical Development Company of Ontario, hence the name inscribed above the doors. It supplied hydro-electric power to nearby Toronto, ON.

The plant is built on top of a deep wheel pit and when it functioned turbines at the bottom of the pit, turned generators at the top by means of long vertical shafts. The water from the turbines ran out at the base of the falls. In its prime, it had a generating capacity of 137,500 horsepower (102,500 kW).

The plant ceased operations on February 15, 1974. In its place Ontario Hydro used the water downriver at the power station in Queenston, ON. The plant is now vacant and was designated a National Historic Site in Canada in 1983, due to its importance in the development of business, industry and technology in Ontario. It is the first wholly Canadian-owned hydro-electric facility at Niagara Falls.

5-E2-F9909-F035-464-B-B807-BF43190057-E0 8-DFA0289-705-E-489-A-988-C-647-E2-F80279-A C6326-F1-B-76-B3-45-A9-9473-165060-DEC0-FA FCDE5-A51-815-A-452-E-843-E-0651-EE1-F3-ADF A84-A5-A4-D-B9-D5-4-BE9-A934-AC476-BDF035-F 188-C0392-4959-49-D9-8-CE6-953166-A74-CD1 8-B33-FD25-4222-4-D51-94-D3-C7771-CE87286 C0-E30-AE8-B5-EB-48-D0-A507-A99-C75-E3-CEDE A5-CC17-D3-B9-E4-4-D4-A-B456-8-B821-AAB7-AED 6-F30190-A-A50-A-4-CAA-88-D2-CBD7-D556816-B

Thursday Trios – This One is for the Birds

thanks for joining me on my Thursday Trios #11 journey

Do you have photos of anything with three objects, people or animals? Join the fun and link this post into your own and I’ll be sure to respond. No deadlines or format requirements.

18-AD5-E0-A-0918-487-B-AFBD-027-E59-D3-FF82 79-C8293-E-1-A65-4-DF6-9-E79-FA4-C5-CE539-E0 E6-AC53-AB-09-A0-48-FD-8-C7-F-699670-C0-E927 344-EED76-AB22-4-A28-B731-4226-CB4-BAF88

Monday Windows – March 1, 2021

thanks to Ludwig for hosting Monday Windows https://mondaywindow.wordpress.com/2021/03/01/monday-window-march-1-2021/

After doing a bit of shopping the other day I decided to drive down into Col. Sam Smith Park and go for a short of a walk. On my way back to the car I passed the outdoor skating rink. Even though we’ve experienced some pretty mild temperatures the rink was still operational because of the pipes under the ice.

In Toronto if you want to skate in one of the city ice rinks you have to book a time so that the area doesn’t become overwhelmed with too many people. A booth is set up outside the old Power Plant where you can sign in. The building itself is closed now during COVID but is used as a community centre.

A19-F2545-E163-4-D76-8145-D5-D50226-F480 5-EF4-AE73-1-A4-D-44-BC-93-D5-9-A674-C9803-F8 4-D8-C5-EA6-D7-A1-40-BA-806-F-9-DAA985261-AD B3-AC7218-FF3-A-4-BDC-9-B93-73-DC589-D6-D59 B019066-D-3-B8-A-420-C-9-A58-FBC9-B297160-F 9-F8-C0-FA9-BCFA-4-E57-928-E-E6-BFCE6-E08-BA C1465-E14-DBBE-4436-B2-E7-E224184562-CB