Warm vs Cool


……from one disaster to one triumph

Last week I had my first failed art class. Well half of it didn’t work out but the second half was more successful. I was teaching my grade 2/3 class about warm and cool colours. It was a concept they easily grasped. I had seen a great project that involved bleeding tissue paper onto white paper to create a beautiful new paper that was either in warm colours or cool colours. In the following class we were going to cut the new paper into pine tree shapes and create a landscape of warm or cool trees.

Unfortunately I didn’t do a sample ahead of time and I didn’t test the tissue paper we had to see if it would bleed. The colours were steadfast. The boys and girls created a colourful collage of tissue shapes using only water. When they dried very little colour came off the tissue. I’m not sure I can salvage this project.

The second project was somewhat more successful. After the children put their papers away to dry they chose warm or cool construction paper and cut out interesting shapes and created a 3D effect by curling or fringing or folding their papers before gluing them onto a black background. I’m hoping to arrange all the cool projects together and all the warm projects together to create two separate wall murals of warm vs cool abstract design.

The next day I was desperate for a new warm vs cool project for my grade 3 class. In the morning before work I got on the internet and googled ‘warm vs cool lesson’ and the first two sites that came up were youtube clips. The one demonstrated a lesson for painting a warm and cool city landscape. It was excellent. The instructor said it was foolproof and that you couldn’t make a mistake. She was right. 

The kids loved this activity. The only part that gave them a little bit of difficulty was drawing in the windows. I had to show them several times how to angle the windows and doors so that the buildings maintained that 3D look.

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

cool vs warm art

 

7 thoughts on “Warm vs Cool

  1. These paintings are beautiful!!! Perfect lesson for warm and cool colors. Nothing like kids art!!! When I taught first grade, we used the book, Drawing With Children, by Mona Brookes. I was always amazed at how, although the drawing was directed the same way, each drawing turned out so different. In first grade they are still so free with their drawings and aren’t bogged down by trying to be perfect. Several of the staff members actually bought a couple of the cat paintings from the students. Makes me want to try it again with my Kindergarteners.
    Enjoy your Sunday!
    Beth

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    • In my ever expanding art gallery outside the library I’m constantly displaying new works of art from my students. Parents and staff often comment on how they can’t believe that the artists who create these beautiful pieces are so young. Thank you for your comments.

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  2. What a wonderful school district you teach in to be able to bring this art education to such young children. They, their community, and our world will be forever enriched because of it. Please remember that any time you are feeling less than perfect. I doubt they kids even noticed the fail. Most of them probably just enjoyed the creativity associated with it. These activities have been proven to enhance understanding in other subjects, especially math and science. I envy your opportunity to make such a profound difference in the future. Thank you for caring enough.

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